November 29, 2016 By:
DMV Recruits- You need to focus on the actual school. Not the football program or the mascot. You need to ask yourself, "Would I go to this school if I wasn't playing football?" If NO, then you shouldn't go there. If Yes, then you need to look forward to potential degrees you will earn in the future. Don't worry if you don't know what degree you want right now. You need to look at your possible degrees. Check out the class sizes, the location, and many other aspects. You need to be comfortable with the school because you need to be ready for success as soon as you get there and you need to feel like you belong. Below is a website that can help you make your choices. You can also research the schools through your school counselor. https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/find-colleges/how-to-find-your-college-fit/quick-guide-starting-your-college-search?excmpid=SM056-AL-1-tw

October 19, 2016 By:
https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/register/online-registration-help?excmpid=SM056-AL-1-tw It’s a good idea to plan ahead — and get comfy — before you start to register. 1.Sign in to your free College Board account. https://account.collegeboard.org/login/login?idp=ECL&appId=115&DURL=https://nsat.collegeboard.org/satweb/login.jsp Your parent or counselor can’t register for you. 2.Provide your full, legal name and other identifying information. Make sure it’s the exact same name and information shown on your photo ID. 3.Decide if you want to answer other questions about yourself. This takes time, but it’s worth it if you want colleges and scholarship organizations to find you. Learn why you should opt in to Student Search Service®. https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/about/benefits/student-search-service 4.Decide whether to sign up for the SAT with Essay. DO THE ESSAY! 5.Upload a photo that meets very specific photo requirements. 6.Check out, and print your Admission Ticket. You Might Also Need ... •If you’re using a fee waiver, enter the identification number on your fee waiver card. •If you’ve been approved by the College Board to test with accommodations, enter the SSD number on your eligibility letter. •If you’re home-schooled, enter 970000 when asked for a high school code. Detailed Instructions Get details about registration and test day policies and requirements, fees, and more in the SAT and SAT Subject Tests Student Registration Booklet (.pdf/979KB).

October 19, 2016 By:
You need to do your research on each and every school. There are thousands of colleges to choose from, but which should go on your college list? Use these steps to begin your college search. You have to ask yourself. Would you go to the school if you weren't playing sports? https://bigfuture.collegeboard.org/find-colleges/how-to-find-your-college-fit/quick-guide-starting-your-college-search?excmpid=SM056-AL-1-tw

June 29, 2016 By:
https://www.higherscorestestprep.com/how-to-get-into-an-ivy-league-school/ How to Get Into an Ivy League School with Chuck Hughes (Episode 3) March 26, 2014 | Written by Lauren | Leave a Comment The College Checklist Podcast: College Search, Admission, Scholarships, Test Prep, and MoreToday on The College Checklist podcast, we talk to Chuck Hughes, the founder and president of Road to College, about academics. This is part 1 of a 2 part series of interviews I did with the Road to College team. With Chuck, we will talk about what it takes to get into an Ivy League school as we discuss academic rigor and get to know how colleges interpret a student’s coursework. The way colleges and universities view your academic history might surprise you! We’ll also discuss a number of accelerated course options available through some high schools, including Honors, Advanced Placement (AP), and International Baccalaureate (IB) programs. These kinds of programs are viewed favorably by the most competitive colleges and some require planning ahead so that you’ll be eligible to participate. The College Checklist Podcast – How to Get Into an Ivy League School ubscribe: iTunes | Android | RSS Subscribe on iTunes (iOS): https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/college-checklist-podcast/id848902813 Subscribe on Stitcher (Android): http://www.stitcher.com/podcast/the-college-checklist-podcast About Chuck Hughes Chuck is of the founder of Road to College – a college admissions consulting service. He has experienced the college admissions process from all angles. He is a Harvard graduate, a former teacher and former senior Harvard admissions officer as well as the author of What It Really Takes to Get Into Ivy League and Other Highly Selective Colleges*. Show Notes Resources Mentioned in this podcast Advanced Placement Program (AP) International Baccalaureate (IB) Lightning Round Q&A Q1: What’s your best piece of advice for families as they begin this journey? A1: Make sure your child performs in the classroomm, and be an active parents in the process. Q2: What is your favorite college admissions book, blog, or tool that no family should be without? A2: What It Really Takes to Get Into Ivy League and Other Highly Selective Colleges by Chuck Hughes* Q3: What should a family who is overwhelmed by the college admissions process focus on? A3: Remember that success in life is not predicated on what college you go to. Q4: What are your all-time favorite books? A4: The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoyevsky*, The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini*, Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer*, The Old Man and The Sea by Ernest Hemingway*, and The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway* *These links are affiliate links through Amazon. You will not pay extra; however, we do receive a small reimbursement if you purchase through our links. Thank you for your support of The College Checklist Podcast!

June 29, 2016 By:
https://www.higherscorestestprep.com/act-vs-sat-class-of-2017/ June 9, 2015 | Written by Lauren | 10 Comments ACT vs SAT: Which test should students in the class of 2017 take?This year’s rising juniors are facing an epic year of change. Unfortunately, that means stress levels are through the roof right now. There is so much uncertainty about what the new SAT will bring that many families feel lost. College admissions testing is usually a stressful event. Now it’s almost unbearable. Here’s the first bit of good news: all juniors are in the same boat. Everyone is confused right now. Many families don’t know what to do. There is solace in the fact that you’re all facing the same challenges in the same year, which means all equally confused people will be applying at the same time. It’s an unfortunate fact, but it can help keep you grounded when things feel overwhelming. The next bit of good news is this: I’m here for you! Whether you listen to my college admissions podcast, receive my monthly newsletter, or follow me on Facebook, I’m cranking out as much quality information as I can to help you stay on top of the changes that are coming. To help you decide on the best testing path for your Class of 2017 graduate, I’ve created a step-by-step flow chart! Answer a few simple yes or no questions and you’ll be on the right path in no time! These recommendations are born from almost a decade of working with students and countless hours of research regarding the new exams. I am, admittedly, a cautious advisor because I know that students need more than one test date to shine their brightest. I also try to keep the sanity factor in mind. I know how busy students are and how daunting test prep can be. My programs are built to fit into students lives without causing excessive stress and these testing timeline recommendations are designed with the same goal. I encourage all students – whether they work with me or not – to: 1. choose test dates that fit within their academic and extracurricular schedule. 2. prepare with full commitment to the test prep process for a short period of time. (No more than 8 weeks.) 3. plan to take 2 back-to-back test dates. 4. keep a 3rd test date in reserve…just in case. For more information on why I believe this is the best way to prepare, please listen to episode 42 of The College Checklist Podcast. (higherscorestestprep.com/42) Suffice it to say, there are many different combinations of testing that you could pursue; however, in this year of change, these are the few paths I would recommend to keep everyone – students, parents, and ME! – as calm as possible while still getting the scores we need. To that end, you’ll notice that none of the recommendations below include the new SAT unless absolutely necessary. I did this for 2 reasons. 1. I don’t know the new SAT yet. As a cautious teacher, I will not be recommending (or teaching) the new SAT until I take it myself. That’s right. Until I see the real McCoy in an official testing room in March of 2016, I will not recommend or teach this new exam. 2. Unknowns stress everyone out. It’s going to take College Board some time to work out the kinks with the new SAT. Until it does, I won’t recommend the new SAT. Testing is stressful enough without unknowns! As always, I hope you find this post enormously helpful. And don’t forget, I’m always here if you have a question! You can leave it as a comment at the bottom of this post or come ask it on the Higher Scores Test Prep Facebook Page. Here’s the step-by-step flow chart that will help make smart, stress-free testing choices this year. ACT vs SAT for the Class of 2017 Step 1: Has your student already completed Algebra II? If yes, proceed to step 2. If no, proceed to step 3. Step 2: Will your student attempt to become a National Merit Scholarship Award Winner? (Not sure? Does he or she regularly test in the 80th percentile or above on standardized exams?) If yes, proceed to step 4. If no, proceed to step 5. Step 3: Prepare for and take the ACT twice on back-to-back test dates in December & February, February & April, or April & June. Reserve the September or October ACT test date in senior year for a third attempt at a higher score, if needed. (To hear my recommendations for setting the perfect testing timeline, listen to episode 42 of The College Checklist Podcast. higherscorestestprep.com/42) Step 4: Prepare for and take the September & October ACT. If you choose to prepare with Higher Scores Test Prep, join in the free weekly webinars I’ll be hosting for my students after the September ACT to help National Merit students prepare for the PSAT in early October. If you are selected as a National Merit Semi-Finalist (notified in late December or early January), proceed to step 7. If you are not selected as a National Merit Semi-Finalist, proceed to step 8. Step 5: I recommend one of two plans for students who have taken Algebra 2 and are not attempting National Merit. Plan A: (highly recommended) Prepare for and take the ACT on two back-to-back test dates whenever best fits your schedule. (e.g. September & October, October & December, December & February, February & April, or April & June) Plan B: (not a good fit for most students) Prepare for and take the current 2400 SAT 3 out of 4 of the following dates: October, November, December, January.* *For this plan to work, students will need to have their scores finalized before the January test date. This is a good plan for students who want to be done with their testing ASAP and do not like the ACT as the new SAT will be similar in terms of timing and format to the ACT. The downside is that it must be completed by January 2016 or else students will need to prepare for a second exam – either the ACT or the new SAT. (Not sure which test is the best fit for you? Sign up to receive my free video – ACT vs SAT. Visit higherscorestestprep.com/actvsat) Step 7: If you are selected as a National Merit Semi-Finalist, you will need to verify your SAT scores with a full-length new SAT in order to progress to Finalist. Plan to verify your PSAT score by taking 2 back-to-back SATs in the fall of your senior year.* You must be done with testing for verification by December 2016. *The new SAT begins in March 2016; however, most students who are National Merit qualifiers tend to be very busy in spring with AP and IB exams, SAT Subject Tests, and finals. My recommendation is that such students focus on their school studies and avoid the new SAT until the fall of their senior year when they likely have a little more time on their hands. Step 8: If you are not selected as a National Merit Semi-Finalist, plan to take the ACT once more when your schedule allows – either in the spring of your junior year or the fall of your senior year – to lock in your very best ACT score possible before applying to college.

June 29, 2016 By:
http://admissionado.com/college/tips-to-prep-for-and-take-the-new-sat/ This is a guest post written by Chelsea Fanning of University Language Services. If you’re going to be taking the SAT in May or June of this year, you’re in luck, because there are tons of resources available to help you prep. The best way to prepare for the New SAT is to get familiar with the redesigned test (which we’ll go over later in the post) in addition to focusing on finding a study method that works for you. For instance, if you’re the sort of person who needs structure and thrives in group settings, an SAT class taught over a course of several weeks is ideal. Alternately, if you prefer to study individually you could purchase a practice book and invest in a private tutor. Consider Utilizing Free SAT Prep Options What’s really great about the new SAT, though, is that when it comes to prep materials there are now also a lot of great free options. So whether you‘re an international student or a US citizen who previously could not afford SAT prep classes, you can now get the help you need for free. Check out Kaplan’s free online classes and Khan Academy’s free study materials. Review Important Historical Documents We also suggest that you spend some time brushing up on US historical documents. All of the texts you’ll see on the New SAT are actual historical documents and if it’s been awhile since you’ve read them, you might find the language a little tricky – especially on test day when stress is in play. Take a minute or two and reread the Declaration of Independence and Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream Speech, among others. It will help you familiarize yourself with the style of documents you’ll be asked to analyze on the new SAT, even if the texts you prep for don’t appear on your actual test. TIPS FOR WHEN YOU’RE ACTUALLY TAKING THE NEW SAT When it comes to actually taking the test, we have a few quick tips to help you do your best. First, all of the sections are now considerably longer. This is both a good thing and a potentially bad thing. Concentrate On Maintaining A Good Pace It’s good because you won’t necessarily feel the pressure of the clock beating down on you (some sections on the old SAT were only 10 minutes!). But, on the other hand, it means that you have to pace yourself accordingly. It’s up to you to keep an eye on the time and make sure you’re moving at a good pace. Utilize New Question Format To Your Benefit Always remember, you can skip a question and come back to it if you’re having trouble focusing on it or remembering how exactly to approach it. And because there is no longer a penalty for answering a question incorrectly, it doesn’t hurt to guess. Another great feature of the new SAT is that there are now only four answer choices, instead of five. So if you can eliminate two choices you have a 50/50 chance of getting it right! Keep The Optional Essay In The Back Of Your Mind The other reason it’s important to pace yourself is because the optional essay is now the last section on the test. Students who took the old SAT often felt that the essay portion was the most draining. If you’re going to complete the essay, you’ll want to make sure you have enough energy to tackle it. Make sure you take full advantage of all your breaks, drinking plenty of water and refueling to keep your energy levels up. Even though the essay is optional and only about 25 colleges are currently requiring it, we still highly recommend that you complete it. Why? Well, for one thing you might end up deciding that one of those 25 or so schools that require it is your dream school. It would stink if you couldn’t apply because you decided not to complete the SAT essay. The other reason we suggest you complete the essay is since most schools don’t require it, by choosing to write the essay you’re demonstrating that you’re a high achieving student who doesn’t shy away from a challenge. Of course, we’re just speculating here; there isn’t any hard data yet to show exactly how schools will evaluate students who submit the essay portion versus students who don’t, but there certainly isn’t any harm in completing it. After all, it may be that extra something that pushes your admissions application in to the yes pile.

June 22, 2016 By:
http://mobile.nytimes.com/blogs/well/2016/06/21/what-college-sports-recruiters-can-teach-your-child/?smid=tw-nytimes&smtyp=cur&_r=0&referer=https://t.co/HW2EhTQzS5 By LISA HEFFERNAN and JENNIFER BREHENY WALLACE June 21, 2016 Most children who play team sports will not win a college scholarship. But that doesn’t mean that we can’t learn something from collegiate coaches who spend countless hours evaluating high school athletes on and off the field. As it turns out, the advice head coaches have for prospective recruits will help any student succeed, even those who don’t plan to play sports in college. We spoke with several college coaches from a variety of sports about the qualities they look for in a student as they try to build a successful team. Here are edited excerpts of what they had to say. Alabama Athletics Nick Saban, head football coach at the University of Alabama I tell my players to focus on what you have to do to succeed rather than the result itself. This is true if you want to climb Mount Everest, be the president of IBM or play for Alabama. I ask them: what are your goals, what do you hope to accomplish, and how is your behavior now helping you accomplish those goals? Whether we win or lose, there are technical aspects for every player, things that they did well and things that they did poorly. My focus is on improvement. One game doesn’t define success — it’s momentary. It’s about consistency and performance. I always talked to my [own] kids after their games and looked for the life lessons that came from the things they did or other things that happened in the game. [As a parent] you can have these discussions or leave it to the coach. I think sometimes you need to prepare your child to respond to adversity: If I want to play more, then I need to work harder. Everyone is not entitled to an opportunity to play. That’s not the way of the world. You have to earn your way. Think of [college] as a 40-year decision, not a four-year one. The life lessons learned at that institution will affect them forever. Washington and Lee University Gene McCabe, head coach of men’s lacrosse at Washington and Lee University We all think our kids are the greatest but what is the reality? If your child is talented and loves it, be sure to provide them with competitive opportunities to grow their game and to gain exposure but keep it in perspective. Candidly, I worry about the money that is spent today on competitive youth sports. While families do need to engage in the process and attend tournaments and showcases, they do not need to do it all the time, nor should they take out a second mortgage on the house to pay for it. I always find it interesting to get a voicemail from a parent saying that their son is so busy that he can’t call me himself. Until that kid picks up the phone, I assume they are not interested. When you see a kid who has taken ownership of the process, it tells you that, by and large, they will take ownership of other things in their lives, too. Clemson Athletics Audra Smith, head coach of women’s basketball at Clemson University The kind of athlete I’m looking for is one who can handle adversity. Today, a lot of parents walk around with a safety net so their children won’t get hurt or disappointed — but I want a tough player who understands that when I push them it’s not personal, it’s because I know they have the ability to be better. We need to help our children develop a little toughness so that when they experience toughness down the road, they don’t shut down or shatter emotionally. Parents should look for a good youth coach who demands the best of their kids but is not over the top. Find a coach who fits your child’s personality and who you feel comfortable with as a parent. So when your child says the coach is being tough, you can back up that coach and agree that maybe your child isn’t playing up to his or her potential. That’s what I tell my own daughter when she’s disappointed after a game. Parents need to uphold a coach’s authority, not undermine it. There are kids I don’t recruit because I see their social media. When I see an inappropriate [post], like provocative pictures or inappropriate language, it’s a red flag. It not only tells me about the player, it also tells me that their parents are obviously not aware of what’s going on in their teen’s world, and I don’t feel like I’m going to have that backing from a parent if I have an issue with that child. StanfordPhoto.com Jeremy Gunn, head coach of men’s soccer at Stanford University The biggest asset I look for on the field, past athleticism and skill, is intrinsic drive. The most successful student athletes that I have coached are the ones that, first minute or last minute, winning or losing, hot day or cold day, cup final or “easier game,” show the same type of attitude. If somebody has that drive and work ethic, they will continuously grow and develop. As a coach you are not really recruiting the student athlete for today, you are recruiting who they are going to become and who you think they can be. Everybody has moments when they’re upset and not happy with an outcome. As a parent you can either join in the complaining process or sensibly say to your kids, “What do you think you can do about it? Or what can you do next time?” When a child complains about their coach, you can either join in with the process or you can say, “Have you spoken to your coach about this?” to help guide them to take control of their situation. Being successful requires the same traits no matter what you do. If somebody is a good student, they have already shown perseverance and a desire to succeed. That means they’ve already learned certain skills that are going to make them a good athlete for us. I talk to our student athletes about Dr. Carol Dweck’s work on the growth mind-set, and explain that those are the types of people who are the foundations of our program. People who have been extremely successful have often been reinforced with the fixed idea that they are good and they are special. Then when they move up the levels, I think a great university can sometimes take a huge sledgehammer and smash their ego to smithereens. Now they are no longer top of the heap. They are no longer the superstar athlete. Based on the fixed reinforcement they’ve had their whole life, it logically follows that they are now bad and they are no good. So by educating people that it is a continuous journey, they’re able to handle the situation in a more positive manner. Gil Talbot Lisa Miller, head coach of women’s lacrosse at Harvard University We look for athletes who are also serious students, ones who are challenging themselves in the classroom by taking tough courses and doing well in them. With travel leagues, parents should ask themselves: What will my child be missing by not playing for our town’s team or for their high school? While the players on travel teams are all close in age, in high school a freshman may be playing with a senior and vice versa. Kids learn social skills when they have to play with people of different ages and levels. Upperclassmen are learning to be leaders, and freshmen are learning to be part of a team’s culture. These are skills that kids need to play at the college level and later on in the workplace. To play at an elite level, you’re going to have to play at the club level. But you don’t have to be on the road every weekend so that you’re missing family vacations, not forming friendships with the kids in the neighborhood or giving up a chance to play another sport. Ninety percent of our athletes played multiple sports in high school. Multi-sport play reduces overuse injuries and exercises different muscles — but there’s also a learning benefit. You might be the star lacrosse player but when it comes to basketball, you may be on the bench for most of the game. It’s a good learning experience for a kid to have to sit on the bench. It puts them in another person’s shoes and teaches them empathy, which will make them a better leader and teammate. Columbia Athletics / Mike McLaughlin Tracey Bartholomew, head coach of women’s soccer at Columbia University I think one of the things that kids don’t handle well is constructive criticism. They don’t know how to process it when they’re hearing things that aren’t praiseworthy all the time. You want parents to be encouraging, but also not afraid to give constructive criticism. A coachable kid who can handle constructive criticism — that goes a long way. As children get older, it’s important to teach them how to self-reflect. Instead of giving your opinion right away, ask them what they thought about the game. If they’re too hard on themselves, stop them and say, here are two or three things you did well and here’s the thing you’ll need to work on for next time. Help them learn to process it. We vet players by talking to their club coaches. I want to know: Is this the kid who after practice is by themselves, wearing their headphones, walking quickly off the field? Or is this the kid who picks up the cones and the pinnies and helps out? I want the kid who picks up the cones, who has that awareness of other people. In developing a team, I look for people who are not selfish. I honestly would take A- or B+ level talent but A+ characteristics because those people tend to rise when things get harder.

June 17, 2016 By:
http://admissionado.com/college/tips-to-prep-for-and-take-the-new-sat/ This is a guest post written by Chelsea Fanning of University Language Services. If you’re going to be taking the SAT in May or June of this year, you’re in luck, because there are tons of resources available to help you prep. The best way to prepare for the New SAT is to get familiar with the redesigned test (which we’ll go over later in the post) in addition to focusing on finding a study method that works for you. For instance, if you’re the sort of person who needs structure and thrives in group settings, an SAT class taught over a course of several weeks is ideal. Alternately, if you prefer to study individually you could purchase a practice book and invest in a private tutor. Consider Utilizing Free SAT Prep Options What’s really great about the new SAT, though, is that when it comes to prep materials there are now also a lot of great free options. So whether you‘re an international student or a US citizen who previously could not afford SAT prep classes, you can now get the help you need for free. Check out Kaplan’s free online classes and Khan Academy’s free study materials. Review Important Historical Documents We also suggest that you spend some time brushing up on US historical documents. All of the texts you’ll see on the New SAT are actual historical documents and if it’s been awhile since you’ve read them, you might find the language a little tricky – especially on test day when stress is in play. Take a minute or two and reread the Declaration of Independence and Martin Luther King’s I Have a Dream Speech, among others. It will help you familiarize yourself with the style of documents you’ll be asked to analyze on the new SAT, even if the texts you prep for don’t appear on your actual test. TIPS FOR WHEN YOU’RE ACTUALLY TAKING THE NEW SAT When it comes to actually taking the test, we have a few quick tips to help you do your best. First, all of the sections are now considerably longer. This is both a good thing and a potentially bad thing. Concentrate On Maintaining A Good Pace It’s good because you won’t necessarily feel the pressure of the clock beating down on you (some sections on the old SAT were only 10 minutes!). But, on the other hand, it means that you have to pace yourself accordingly. It’s up to you to keep an eye on the time and make sure you’re moving at a good pace. Utilize New Question Format To Your Benefit Always remember, you can skip a question and come back to it if you’re having trouble focusing on it or remembering how exactly to approach it. And because there is no longer a penalty for answering a question incorrectly, it doesn’t hurt to guess. Another great feature of the new SAT is that there are now only four answer choices, instead of five. So if you can eliminate two choices you have a 50/50 chance of getting it right! Keep The Optional Essay In The Back Of Your Mind The other reason it’s important to pace yourself is because the optional essay is now the last section on the test. Students who took the old SAT often felt that the essay portion was the most draining. If you’re going to complete the essay, you’ll want to make sure you have enough energy to tackle it. Make sure you take full advantage of all your breaks, drinking plenty of water and refueling to keep your energy levels up. Even though the essay is optional and only about 25 colleges are currently requiring it, we still highly recommend that you complete it. Why? Well, for one thing you might end up deciding that one of those 25 or so schools that require it is your dream school. It would stink if you couldn’t apply because you decided not to complete the SAT essay. The other reason we suggest you complete the essay is since most schools don’t require it, by choosing to write the essay you’re demonstrating that you’re a high achieving student who doesn’t shy away from a challenge. Of course, we’re just speculating here; there isn’t any hard data yet to show exactly how schools will evaluate students who submit the essay portion versus students who don’t, but there certainly isn’t any harm in completing it. After all, it may be that extra something that pushes your admissions application in to the yes pile.

June 9, 2016 By:
There are many advantages that stand to be reaped from the massive advancement attained in this century in the field of information and technology. College students now have easier and more advanced ways of gaining knowledge. There is also a better and more efficient way to exchange knowledge and information. However, one advantage may be overlooked as being trivial but at times, it becomes thoroughly necessary. I am talking of writing services. [br] Through the internet, the student is able to have access to the services of the top professional writers. These writers become quite useful when the student has a mountain of assignments which has to be completed within an oddly short period of time. Online writing services such as may step in this situation and come up with essays on behalf of the student. These essays are not only completed in a short time, but there are so perfectly done that the student is almost always guaranteed of an A when the essay is graded. [br] One of the downsides of online writing services is probably the fact that the student has to pay for these services. Even though the cost of a hiring a writing service varies depending on a number of factors, the price is not always cheap